Beyond Technocracy - Science, Politics and Citizens

von: Massimiano Bucchi

Springer-Verlag, 2009

ISBN: 9780387895222 , 110 Seiten

Format: PDF, OL

Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen

Windows PC,Mac OSX Apple iPad, Android Tablet PC's Online-Lesen für: Windows PC,Mac OSX,Linux

Preis: 107,09 EUR

Mehr zum Inhalt

Beyond Technocracy - Science, Politics and Citizens


 

Acknowledgements

5

Contents

6

Introduction

8

Science and Society: A Clash of Civilizations?

8

The Technocratic Response: All Power to the Experts

10

1.1 The “Missionary” Wing of Technocracy: “Deficit” and the Public Understanding of Science

10

1.2 The Flimsy Pillars of the Technocratic View

14

1.3 Democracy and Ignorance

19

1.4 A Flour that Threatened to Bring Down a Government

28

Einstein Has Left the Building: Coming to Terms with Post- academic Science

34

2.1 A Post-academic Science?

34

2.2 After Doctor Strangelove: How I Learned Not to Worry and Love the Stock Exchange

35

2.3 Whose Knowledge?

38

2.4 From Physics to Biology

44

2.5 A Mediatized Science

45

2.6 A Science Without Boundaries

49

2.7 The Eclipse of the Scientific Community?

52

2.8 … In the Meantime, Society Does Not Stand By and Watch

55

Citizens Enter the Laboratory Whilst Scientists Take to the Streets

57

3.1 From Two Stubborn Parents to Seven Thousand Square Metres of Laboratory

57

3.2 Childhood Leukaemia in Woburn: “Hybrid Forums” and the Co- production of Knowledge

59

3.3 Technoscience Debated in the Courts

62

3.4 From Users to Innovators: How a Windsurfer Kept Himself Afloat and Became Something of a Designer

64

3.5 Everyone Around a Table: Promoting Civic Participation in Technoscience

66

3.6 Science and Public Participation: A General Interpretative Framework

71

3.7 The “March of the Test-Tubes”: Scientists Take to the Streets

75

Beyond Technocracy: Democracy in the Age of Technoscience

81

4.1 Beyond the Illusions of Technocracy

81

4.2 Will Bioethics Save Us?

82

4.3 Why Are Citizens Against Biotechnologies?

85

4.4 Knowledge Is Power

88

4.5 The Presumed Neutrality of Technoscience

90

4.6 The Horse that Knew How to Do Sums

93

4.7 The Crisis of the “Double Delegation”

95

4.8 “Etsi Veritas Non Daretur”

96

4.9 Choosing the World We Want

98

Bibliography

105