Quirky Sides of Scientists - True Tales of Ingenuity and Error from Physics and Astronomy

Quirky Sides of Scientists - True Tales of Ingenuity and Error from Physics and Astronomy

von: David R Topper

Springer-Verlag, 2007

ISBN: 9780387710198 , 210 Seiten

Format: PDF, OL

Kopierschutz: Wasserzeichen

Windows PC,Mac OSX Apple iPad, Android Tablet PC's Online-Lesen für: Windows PC,Mac OSX,Linux

Preis: 35,69 EUR

  • Physics of Classical Electromagnetism
    The Nonlinear Universe - Chaos, Emergence, Life
    Advances in Solid State Physics 46
    Creating Assertion-Based IP
    Multiple Stars across the H-R Diagram - Proceedings of the ESO Workshop held in Garching, Germany, 12-15 July 2005
    Non-Linear Dynamics Near and Far from Equilibrium
  • Constructal Theory of Social Dynamics
    Mechatronics and Machine Vision in Practice
    Semiclassical Dynamics and Relaxation
    Rhythm and Transforms
    A History of Thermodynamics - The Doctrine of Energy and Entropy
    Progress in Ultrafast Intense Laser Science I
 

Mehr zum Inhalt

Quirky Sides of Scientists - True Tales of Ingenuity and Error from Physics and Astronomy


 

These historical narratives of scientific behavior reveal the often irrational way scientists arrive at and assess their theories. There are stories of Einstein's stubbornness leading him to reject a correct interpretation of an experiment and miss an important deduction from his own theory, and Newton missing the important deduction from one of his most celebrated discoveries. This enlightening book clearly demonstrates that the greatest minds throughout history arrived at their famous scientific theories in very unorganized ways and they often did not fully grasp the significance and implications of their own work.


http://history.uwinnipeg.ca/topper.html
David R. Topper is Professor of History at the University of Winnipeg where, since 1970, he has taught courses in the history of science and the history of art. He was the recipient of two teaching awards: the Robson Memorial Award for Excellence in Teaching at the University of Winnipeg (1981), and the National 3M Teaching Fellowship (1987). Since 1982 he has been an international co-editor and, from 2005, honorary editor of the journal Leonardo. His recent publications are on matters related to the work of Galileo, Newton, and Einstein.